Halloween short story challenge 2019 Anthology

Hello everyone, I wanted to let you know about a new shot story anthology that I have a story in.

 

72389416_2492090504211068_1742301497061801984_oThe 2019 Halloween Short Story Challenge is an anthology of stories that will tantalize you, terrify you and taunt you. With 25 stories and poems written by 15 authors, there’s something for everyone!

 

 

Presented in alphabetical order:
A Moment of Silence, by Annie Littlewolf
A Moonlight Rose, by Rachel Harris
A Mother’s Love-Feeding Eve, by Michelle Francik
A Spiritual Feast, by Annie Littlewolf
A Witch’s Halloween Surprise (A Fae of Calaveras Story), by Kristen S. Walker
Autumn Harvest, by Virginia M. Barilla
But This Only Happens in Movies, by Katrina O’Brien
Connection, by Michelle Francik
Coughing, by Kristen S. Walker
Darker Than Dark, by Carlos F. Gonzalez
Indulgence, by Michelle Francik
Porch Light, by Ichabod Ebenezer
Seeing Double, by C.O. Bonham
Stay Away From the Cemetery, by Brandy Galaznik
The Coming of Halloween, by Virginia M. Barilla
The Halloween Quilt, by M. Quinn Evans
The Haunted Canal Town, by Kristi Asher
The Master Chef Mouse, by Annie Littlewolf
The Musicians and the Werewolves, by Kristen S. Walker
The Pale Child. by Jeff Bacon
The Watching Eyes, by M. Quinn Evans
Thorns and Firelight, by Hannah Schofield
Touched, by M. Quinn Evans
When Love Comes, by Brandy Morrison
Wicked Rotten Apples, by Michelle Francik

Whether it’s shadows, a love story, or a flame burning bright, these stories will make you think twice about turning off the lights. Curl up with a loved one and enjoy this anthology of all things Halloween!

My story is titled “Seeing Double,” It’s about a villainous robot that can’t quite compute when everyone is dressed as his heroic target during Trick or Treat night. It feature’s Captain Galaxy and his daughter Galaxy girl.

Buy the Anthology here: https://amzn.to/32susaY

It’s available in Ebook, paperback and Kindle Unlimited.

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Pen Prints Flash Dash 2019

Recently I participated in the pen prints flash dash; a flash fiction challenge where you create a story less than one thousand words based on genre and a surprise story prompt. My Genre was superhero and my prompt was an image. The prompt and my entry are below. Enjoy.

Pirouette

By C. O. Bonham

superhero promptHannah leaped and twirled her way across the stage. The passion of the music filling her up and bursting forth in pure streams of fluid movement.

The moment was shattered by a boom. Rather than be frozen by shock, Hannah spun right and jumped left. Zigzagging across the stage she made her way to the edge and stopped.

“What are you doing here?” She crossed her arms and stared down at the man in the midnight blue and purple spandex. Captain Galaxy still had a ring of plasma orbiting around his hand, charged and ready for another blast. Hannah looked to the scorch marks on the molding above the proscenium. “It’s not enough to interrupt my rehearsal, you have to destroy the theater?”

“Well how else was I going to get your attention?”

“You could have tried waiting for me to finish.”

“No time, Galaxy Girl. We have a world to save.”

“Forget it dad.” Hannah spun on her heel. “I told you, I’m not your sidekick anymore.”

Dad used his galaxy powers to negate gravity enough to step up onto the stage. “You can’t quit, you have a responsibility.”

“To use my powers to protect those who can’t protect themselves. I know, but you were the one given these powers. I only have them because I’m your daughter. I have my own dreams. I need to practice for my audition tomorrow.”

His face fell, “You love being Galaxy Girl.”

“I loved spending time with you, but now it’s all about stopping Dr. Retro. It’s training and fighting and foiling. I want a life, dad. I still love you, but I want a different path.” Hannah spun and used her gravity powers to reach the damaged molding. ”I think it will come off with some soap.”

“Do you ever use your powers when your dancing?”

“Stop trying to guilt trip me.” She lowered herself back down to the stage and confronted him. “Why does being powerful mean, I can’t do what I love?”

“Because you’re powerful other people will resent it. Even if you don’t use your powers; they’ll think you did.”

“All the more reason for you to leave before someone sees us together. I only get the stage for thirty minutes.”

 Her father’s face suddenly appeared old to her. His platinum blond hair, now more silver. This was a first for her, realizing as she grew up, her father’d grown old. He turned and floated off the stage. Maybe it wasn’t a good idea to let him do this alone.

Hannah shrugged off the feeling. He was barely fifty. She shuffled upstage to restart her music. She picked up the smart phone beside the bluetooth speaker and noticed several messages from her mother.

Your father is trying to find you.

Has your father found you yet?

Meet your father at the old space center. Dr. Retro has a death ray.

Not the death ray again. Didn’t Dr. Retro know, nearly all rays were deadly: X-rays, uv-rays, stingrays. But still her father was going there alone.

No, she had to practice. Ten more minutes and then she wouldn’t be on this stage again until the audition. She had to make the most of this chance.

The music started and muscle memory carried her body as her mind drifted back. Professor Proton had discovered the one weakness of Captain Galaxy. Her.

 Not only had her father left in the middle of her solo, he had forgotten he needed to drive her home. A nice man had approached her as she sat beside the locked car. “Your father sent me to bring you home,” he had said. After he said the secret phrase she trusted him enough to follow him.

Hannah missed a step and collapsed. She rubbed her knee where it’d hit the stage. The absolute look of fear in her fathers eyes when he saw her in danger had been real. It was only because Proton hadn’t known about her own powers, that they had escaped at all.

Maybe training her, fighting beside her, was his way, of not only protecting her, but of overcoming his own fear. Maybe. There was no time to change.

***

Captain Galaxy had fired off his last plasma blast. The effects of the death ray were taking a toll on his powers. Though his shaky breaths were proof that it didn’t actually shoot rays of death. It was more of an agonizing pain ray. Villains and their naming conventions.

“Ready for another taste of death, Captain Galaxy?” Dr. Retro swung his ray back around and raised his hand to hit the button. But he never fired.

A blur of pink flew in from overhead. “Oh, please,” said a familiar voice, “death ray is such a misnomer. More like vastly over hyped ray.” Then she powered up a plasma blast and sent Dr. Retro flying across the open testing bay.

He smiled. That banter could only have come from one person. “Galaxy Girl, you came.” Seeing her there, vulnerable in her practice clothes with only a ripped piece of cloth around her eyes for anonymity, was enough to make him wish she hadn’t come. Seeing her in danger never got easier.

“Sorry Captain, Galaxy Girl couldn’t come. You can call me Pirouette.” She spoke loudly presumably so the recovering villain could hear her. Then she blasted the death ray controls and flew down to help him up. “Sorry I’m late dad. Are you okay?”

He patted her arm. “I am now.”

They were interrupted by Retro as he finally got up off the floor. “A ballerina? Really? That’s your big superhero schtick?”

“Says Dr. groovy sixties man.”

“Retro like the rocket not retro like vintage.”

“Clearly I’m not late for the monologue.” She flashed him a smile. “I guess no one ever told him what happened to Professor Proton.”

About the story:

I chose Pirouette, not just because it is a ballet term but also because it is the term for turning in place. In the same way Hannah is turning around over her feelings towards her father.  And if you were thinking this was a father daughter story because I’ve been trying to think of a fathers day gift for my dad, then you would be right.

Click here to see the other stories from the flash dash challenge.

The Whispered Tales of Graves Grove

So you may have noticed that I’ve been posting a lot of book releases on this blog. Well I hope you aren’t sick of them because I have another one for you. This time it’s a comedy/horror anthology.  Perfect for the Halloween season.

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Graves Grove isn’t your ordinary town…

Nestled within the folds of the Canadian Rockies, Graves Grove probably isn’t the picturesque place you’d like to stay for long. Peculiar things happen here. The citizens seem normal superficially–they function well enough. But each one is deeply disturbed, wrapped in secrets and neuroses which drive them to strange behaviors.

And then there are all the missing children. And why is everyone afraid of that sycamore tree?

The Whispered Tales of Graves Grove is an anthology of stories taking place throughout the history of this mysterious town, from its founding to its future. Read them…if you dare.

Here are the Graves Grove Amazon links: KindlePaperback, and even Hardcover.

Proceeds will benefit Reading is Fundamental. A non-profit that helps improve literacy skills and brings a love of reading to kids across America.

And wait until I tell you the best part.

Inside the Whispered Tales of Graves Grove you can find the short stories:

“The Canadian Cottingly” and “Fairy Troubled”

(I’ll give you one guess what those are about.)

Why are these two stories so special? Well, because they were both written by me.

Hooray for being published.

But don’t just read it for my stories. Graves Grove also contains stories from lots of other authors too.

If you are looking for a spooky collection of stories to entertain you and make you laugh, then purchase the Whispered Tales of Graves Grove and support a for a good cause.

 

 

The Feud Worth Forgetting: Part 12 (the last)

I apologize for not posting last week. I was really busy working and having Easter celebrations. But I remembered to do one now so here is one more installment of “The Feud Worth Forgetting”. I almost left this part out because I liked the note that part Eleven left off on but if I post this part it makes an even dozen. Plus I already had this written so I might as well use it.

*     *     *

The family, packed into the mini van, was settling for a long drive.

“Mom?” said Harriet.

“Yes dear.” Her mother turned around in the front seat.

“If you wanted to tell us some stories I could write them down for you.” She replied clicking her pen and placing its tip to the notebook in her lap.”

Her mom smiled. “What kind of stories did you have in mind?”

“We’re talking about Colleges earlier. How about starting there? You were an engineering major right?”

“Yes and we had to work really hard just to get in.” Mom turned back around to stare out the windshield.

“So what did you have to do?”

“Sit ins mostly. We just sat around taking up space.” She stopped and looked like she was trying really hard to remember something. She glanced over and saw that wicked grin on her husbands face. The grin she fell in love with. It was a grin that reminded her that she really didn’t want her children knowing everything that she did in college. So forgetting that she was trying to remember something she simply said, “Nothing really interesting happened in College. Just studying and learning.”

“Really nothing at all happened?” asked Carla.

“It was the sixties honey,” said their father, “No one can remember what they were doing back then.”

©  This story and subsequent parts are my own original idea and are protected under United States copy right law.

The Feud Worth Forgetting: Part Eleven

“I remembered something.” Said Juliet, standing in the hall door, her mousy brown hair was just starting to grow back in. The ugly scar from the brain surgery was still visible through the spiky follicles. The Chemo might have stolen her hair but it was the surgery to remove the tumor that had left her a past-less and almost lifeless shell for the past four months.

“What do you remember, Honey?” asked her husband.

“It came back slowly at first. It might have almost been a dream,” she angled the recliner toward the couch and sat down. “It was at night. No it was afternoon but there was a terrible thunder storm. I kept starring at my reflection in this glass door watching the rain pour down outside. And I had a canvas, a painting I had done. That one actually.” She pointed above Joel’s head to a pointillism of an old wooden fence in a field of wheat.

“Then you came in the door Jerry. And you asked if I was waiting for a ride. I said ‘no, just waiting for the rain to stop so I could walk home.’ Then you said that I would have a long wait and that you were early anyway and you could give me ride if I was willing. Then I said that I shouldn’t ride with strange men and besides the rain would ruin my painting before I could make it to the car.” Juliet stopped her narrative and rubbed her temples as if trying to coax the memory back to the surface.

Her husband picked it up where she had left off. “Then I said my name is Jerry and I work in the library. And grabbed large garbage bags from the janitors closet and we wrapped the painting in then and I drove you home.”

“Yes that’s it exactly.” She stood up from her seat. And squeezed in between her son and her husband on the couch.

“You remembered the day we first met.”

“and I think I remember when Joel was born.” She reached out and wrapped her arms around her son. “And I remember that I love you so much.”

“I love you too mom.” Tears were beginning to pool in Joel’s eyes.

Her husband embraced his family with tears running down his cheeks. “It’s good to have you back honey.” He said.

“It’s good to be back. Do you still have my painting supplies? I think I’d like to start painting again.”

“It’s all right where you left it sweetheart. I am glad you’re getting your past back.”

“No not the past. My future. I got my future back.”

 

©  This story and subsequent parts are my own original idea and are protected under United States copy right law.

The Feud Worth Forgetting: Part Ten

The girls, Harriet and Carla, pulled into the tree shrouded driveway and immediately sensed a grim stillness. They got down from the pickup which now seemed too high. They approached the house via an ever lengthening walkway to the front door.

The screen door squeaked open on it’s hinges. The sisters looked up to see their father placing two suitcases in the front hallway. “Your mother and I are going to Tennessee for a few days. If you’re coming you should probably get packed”

“Grandma?” was all Harriet could say.

Their father nodded and Carla took off to her room to start packing. Harriet was about to follow her twins example when the sound of heavy sobbing came out of her parents room. She pushed the door open and saw her Mom sitting on the bed crying into a wad of tissues. A cell phone was on the bed beside her. Harriet rushed in and wrapped her arms around her mothers shoulders.

“She didn’t even wait for me to say goodbye. Why? First she’s in the Hospital and now she’s gone. Why couldn’t she wait for me to get there?”

“Oh mom. It probably wasn’t her choice.”

Dad was standing in the door way listening, “I’ll go tell Carla that there’s no hurry now.,” he said and walked away.

“I just wish so much knowledge hadn’t died with her.” Mom said wiping her eyes again. “She was trying to find the truth in some of my Grandma’s old stories. At one time she had this great big book of Family History and your grandma had it traced almost back to the Revolutionary War.”

“What happened to it?”

It wasn’t Harriet who asked this.

Looking up from her tear soaked tissue pulp mom saw Carla standing in the doorway, her father’s arm resting on her shoulders. “I can’t really say. Mom must have found something bad in her research. Because she came home and burned it all. She said, ‘Alison remember, some things were meant to be forgotten.’ And then she threw what looked like an old diary into the flames after her family research book.”

“Wow.” Was all either of the girls could think of to say.

“I wish I could remember my Grandmas stories. I should have written them down.” Carla came in and joined her mother and sister on the bed. The closeness of her children started another round of tears in Alison daughter of Carolina Gellervice. “If I had only taken more of an interest in her research. Maybe I could have stopped her from burning our Family history.”

Dad finally entered the room. “Not if she was right.” He stood his wife up and held her in his embrace. “Maybe some things should be forgotten.”

©  This story and subsequent parts are my own original idea and are protected under United States copy right law.

The Feud Worth Forgetting: Part Nine

Joel Richter slammed his car door. Then he slammed the house door.  “Your mother is sleeping.” His fathers voice hissed from the living room loud enough to compete with the blaring TV set.

Joel entered to the same sight that he entered to everyday. His Father, sitting in front of the TV, history channel on and a stack of papers to grade on the coffee table in front of him.

“Sorry.” Joel said taking a seat on the couch.

“So what’s eating you kid?” his dad asked.

“Just this jerk that cut right in front of me off road five. If I hadn’t been slowing down to turn we would have wrecked.”

“But you didn’t. That’s what I’ve been always telling you. You watch out for yourself. As long as you aren’t at fault the other guys insurance will cover it.”

“It was weird. I had the right of way but this truck it was like the driver couldn’t even see me. It was stopped. Stopped like it was going to let me go but then she just pulled out in front of me. Slowly, as if the intersection was empty, in no big hurry.”

“It figures. There are a lot of Crazy Drivers. You’ve got to watch out for them.”

“I know Dad,” Joel said. He stared at the TV and then decided that it would be better to change the subject, “So have you made any progress on your book?”

“No,” his father said placing the paper he had been reading back down on top of the pile. “I gave up. This morning I deleted everything from my computer and I threw away the rest of it.”

Joel looked at his father with a look of horror. “What, Why, How could you do that?”

“Because your mom was right. If the story isn’t true then there’s nothing to find except a pile of historical anecdotes and bizarre coincidences.” His Father paused and took a deep breath, “and if the story is true then it’s not for us to find out about.”

©  This story and subsequent parts are my own original idea and are protected under United States copy right law.

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